Music Together's Mission

Music Together's Philosophy

To bring the highest-quality music and movement experiences to your child—and children everywhere— and to involve the adults who love them in the magical process of development that only music can provide.
Many people mistakenly believe that only a talented few are musical and the rest of us are doomed to sing out of tune and dance with two left feet. But the truth is, we are all born musical. In a supportive environment, children learn to dance and sing as naturally as they learn to walk and talk . This knowledge helped us develop a four-point philosophy that guides the Music Together program to this day.

Our Basic Philosophic Principles

1. All children are musical.
 
2. All children can achieve basic music competence—the ability to sing in tune and move with accurate rhythm.
 
3. The participation and modeling of parents and caregivers—regardless of their musical ability—are essential to a child's musical growth.
 
4. Young children’s musical growth occurs best in a playful, musically rich, and developmentally appropriate setting.

A Research-based Program

Music Together is grounded in research in music and early childhood development. When creating the program, coauthors Kenneth K. Guilmartin and Dr. Lili M. Levinowitz, examined the field of music education—and then reached beyond it into the realm of early childhood learning. They realized that even the best song they could discover or compose would miss the mark if not presented in ways children can receive readily and process meaningfully.
 
So, the pair turned to the fields of neuroscience, psychology, and early childhood learning for valuable insights into how the brain processes and organizes musical material, how children learn, and how the surrounding environment can support this learning. Then they distilled their findings into four basic principles, which remain the cornerstones of Music Together's philosophy today.
 
Learn more about the research basis of Music Together and Ken and Lili's positions on early childhood music education in these formative articles: